Articles Posted in Attorney Practice Tips

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Back in the early Summer of 2017, most of the experts — the pundits, if you will — were predicting that American businesses were not going to spend as much in 2018 on advice from employment law attorneys.

Then, in September 2017, along came a guy named Harvey Weinstein. Continue reading

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Eric, congratulations on the new gig with Fisher — it’s FisherBroyles, right?” they said with scrunched, skeptical faces that didn’t quite match their words of encouragement.

I got a lot of that when, after 12 years at a large, traditional law firm, I catapulted to the first and largest full-service cloud-based law firm in the world.  

‘Catapulted’ is intentional. Sure, you can soar to new heights. But, the ultimate impact can be hard and messy.

So, how has the first year of practice been at FisherBroyles? Continue reading

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One of your employees just complained to human resources that a co-worker sexually harassed her. As a responsible employer, you decide not only to investigate the complaint but to engage outside counsel to lead the investigation. Outside counsel investigates. When the investigation ends, outside counsel creates an investigative report.

If the lawsuit follows, must the company share that report with the plaintiff? Continue reading

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What if.

I’m just saying, what if you could have an employee sign some sort of a contract, maybe an employee agreement, in which the employee agreed to shorten the statute of limitations on all employment claims to six months.

Given that employees often have years in which to assert claims, the ol’ statute-of-limitations shortener could be a gold mine!

Continue reading

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Back in the day, landing on “Community Chest” in Monopoly was second only to building hotels on Boardwalk.

But, even with inflation, neither approaches the feeling of discovering that your employer goofed by agreeing to provide you with $2,747,400 in severance pay, rather than the previously agreed-upon $80,805.97.

Yep, that happened.

Rut roh! Continue reading

“Doing What’s Right – Not Just What’s Legal”