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Proving once again that freedom of speech is a big, fat myth when it comes to keeping one’s job, an Ohio firefighter has been suspended after he posted on Facebook about how he would rather save a dog than a million n*****s.

According to the Ariel Zilber at The Daily Mail (here), the Franklin Township Fire Department informed Tyler Roysdon that was suspended indefinitely for his inflammatory Facebook post. Amy Feinstein at Inquisitr reports (here) that the FD cannot terminate Ms. Roysdon. That’s up to the Board of Trustees, which is scheduled to hold a disciplinary hearing later this month.

Ms. Zilbert’s report indicates that Mr. Roysdon’s chances at reinstatement are slim and none:

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I’m not sure what kind of evidence a federal jury was expecting when it concluded that two plaintiff-intervenors (i.e., the alleged victims of sexual harassment on whose behalf the EEOC pursued claims) did not do enough to notify the employer-defendant about possible harassment in the workplace.

And neither did a federal judge when he concluded that a federal jury plainly overlooked evidence that the employer-defendant should have known about possible sexual harassment.

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Not even close to that fun.

No, it’s about a guy who got fired after his employer concluded that he had gained unauthorized access to its electronic files. It just so happens that the plaintiff accessed those files to assist his employer in defending two discrimination actions that other employees had pending against the employer. Either way, because of the firing, the plaintiff alleged retaliation.

How can firing an employee who is trying to help his employer with discrimination claims be considered retaliatory? See, e.g., the headline of today’s blog post.

I’ll explain. Continue reading

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Today, I’m blogging about a company that wrote a settlement check, entered into something called a “Compromise and Release Agreement” (more on that in a bit) to resolve claims from a former employee, and now finds itself defending Family and Medical Leave Act claims.

That’s got me like

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EzekielElliottFinally, I’m putting this law degree to good use.

Today, you get this employer lawyer’s insights on not only the status of National Football League Players Association‘s efforts to overturn the National Football League‘s 6-game suspension of Ezekiel Elliott, but also real information about when Elliott may return to action.

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