PhotoFunia-1558088914

Image Credit: Photofunia.com

In a statement issued earlier this week, House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler (D-NY) announced that he would “not rest” until Congress passed “historic legislation to end forced arbitration.”

I have a feeling Mr. Nadler is going to be pretty tired. But, let’s see what this is all about. Continue reading

Manolo Blahnik on Whitney Port Shankbone 2009 Tribeca.jpg

By David ShankboneOwn work, CC BY 3.0, Link

Yesterday’s post was all about the breadth of the Pregnancy Discrimination Act (PDA). We addressed a situation in which a plaintiff alleged that her employer fired her for seeking an abortion. The court concluded that, if true, the employer’s actions would have violated the PDA.

(The employer ultimately prevailed on the PDA claim because it had a non-discriminatory reason for firing the plaintiff.)

Today, let’s shift focus to accommodations under the PDA. Continue reading

A Louisiana woman claimed that, back in September 2017, she told her employer that she had become pregnant and that she was planning on having an abortion. The woman then alleged that, during her time off from work, the company violated the Pregnancy Discrimination Act (PDA) by firing her.

Let’s assume that the company did fire her for getting an abortion. Does that violate the PDA? Continue reading

Seal of the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

U.S. Government [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

It took nearly two years for the Senate to vote on Janet Dhillon, President Trump’s nominee to Chair the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

However, last week, the Senate finally confirmed Ms. Dillon. So, not only does the EEOC have a new leader, but it also has a quorum with three out of five Commissioner seats filled.

What does this mean for employers? A lot. Continue reading

“Doing What’s Right – Not Just What’s Legal”