Articles Posted in Gender

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Just before the Labor Day weekend, I blogged here about an Americans with Disabilities Act complaint filed in federal court by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission that should have employers scrutinizing their leave policies and procedures.

Today, I’ve got news of another EEOC lawsuit filed in my backyard in the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. As I explain below, this one will have you reaching for a different leave policy — parental leave — to ensure no that there’s no hatin’ on the fellas. Continue reading

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Honestly, I generally try not to resort to clickbait ledes or trending terms like Donald Trump, Taylor Swift, Solar Eclipse, Game of Thrones finale spoilers, and leaked Apple iPhone 8 images, to increase web traffic. That’s beneath a professional ***fart*** blogger like me.

But, since you’re here, please form a single-file line. My servers can only handle so many of you at a time.

Thank you. Continue reading

Philadelphia City Hall

Earlier this year, Philadelphia passed a law banning employers from asking about a job applicant’s salary history. In that blog post, I foreshadowed a possible lawsuit from business groups to block the law, which would otherwise take effect on May 23.

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1870 two cents rev

I’ll open this post with a haiku. Because, I feel like we could all use a haiku.

President-Elect
For HR, what will he do?
Not a stinkin’ clue!

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On average, organizations gave mothers 41 paid days of maternity leave, compared with 22 paid days of paternity leave for fathers. That statistic comes from 2016 Paid Leave in the Workplace, a survey recently conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management.

Does this disparity demonstrate discrimination against men?

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Last month, Massachusetts passed a new law, which will take effect in July 2018, and make it illegal for employers to ask about a job applicant’s salary history before making an offer of employment.  As Stacy Cowley at The New York Times reports (here), the impetus for the new law is to reduce the wage gap between men and women:

By barring companies from asking prospective employees how much they earned at their last jobs, Massachusetts will ensure that the historically lower wages and salaries assigned to women and minorities do not follow them for their entire careers. Companies tend to set salaries for new hires using their previous pay as a base line.

Now, three members of the U.S. House of Representatives, including Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton, the first woman to chair the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), plan to introduce similar legislation federally.

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