By Roger Cook and Don Shanosky (Unknown) [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons

As is often the case when a Republican sits in the Oval Office, the National Labor Relations Board tilts employer-friendly. Indeed, once President Trump’s two nominees fill two vacancies on the Board, Republicans will hold a Board majority for the first time in 9 years.

Until then, I picture the more employee-friendly Board remaining from the Obama years going out in a blaze of glory.

Lighters up! Continue reading

Sean Combs.jpgWhen others go high, I go low.

Wait a minute! I got that backwards didn’t I?  Dammit! That explains why I didn’t come up with “In Firing Employees, A Bit of Humanity Still Helps.” It’s a pragmatic post inspired by recent events from employment lawyer and blogger, Daniel Schwartz.

Instead, I get my HR-compliance news from a TMZ story entitled, “I HAD TO SERVE HIS POST-SEX MEALS… He Served Up His Junk.” Welp, there’s only one thing left to do, I guess.

Yes, I’d better double down. Continue reading

Elizabeth Warren Nov 2 2012.jpg

So, I’m calling you know what on Senator Warren’s tweet last week.

Yes, the U.S. House of Representatives did greenlight a measure called the Working Families Flexibility Act of 2017. This bill would allow, in certain situations, the substitution of comp time for overtime. And, if it passes through the Senate, the President is likely going to sign it.

But unlike the scare posts from other publications, which suggest that the sky will fall if the Working Families Flexibility Act of 2017 becomes law, I’ll explain why this law is good for employers and employees. Continue reading

Image Credit: Pixabay.com

There are three types of disabilities under the Americans with Disabilities Act:

  • a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities (an “actual disability”), or
  • a record of a physical or mental impairment that substantially limited a major life activity (“record of”), or
  • an actual or perceived impairment that is not both transitory and minor (“regarded as”).

It’s the “regarded as” prong that I’m going to address today with a little help from the EEOC and Yo Gabba Gabba. Continue reading