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Earlier this month, a Pennsylvania federal court held that plaintiffs in a contractual-dispute matter must reimburse the defendants, who prevailed on summary judgment, for all costs that the defendants incurred in the production of e-discovery.

Now that’s a hammer!

More on this decision and how it might apply in an employee lawsuit against an employer, after the jump.

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Although the Americans with Disabilities Act does not protect employees or applicants who use illegal drugs, it does protect those who are “participating in a supervised rehabilitation program, have successfully such a program, or who have otherwise been rehabilitated successfully.

Does that mean that an employer cannot refuse to hire someone who, on the day after he completes a drug rehab program, applies for work?

Find out, after the jump.

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I had trouble sleeping last night.

If you read yesterday’s post, you know that when deciding between a post about an NFL cheerleader who was fired for risque pictures mailed to the Indianapolis Colts versus labor law and Twitter, I chose labor law and Twitter.

***stupid Twitter!***

I won’t make the same mistake twice. So, without further ado, I have the pictures federal-court complaint of the fired cheerleader and a brief rundown of her chances of success.

***Oh, Twitter. I can’t stay mad at you. I’ll give you a foot rub — right after I finish this can of Four Loko.***

Don’t judge me. Just skip past the jump. TGIF, yo.

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I was considering three topics for today’s post:

  1. A teacher who was fired for watching 67 seconds of pornography;
  2. This smokin-hot cheerleader, fired for the NSFW-version of the photo on the right, who has filed a national-origin discrimination claim against the Indianapolis Colts; or
  3. A National Labor Relations Board Advice Memorandum on employee use of Twitter in the workplace.

I went with No. 3. I stand by my decision. 

Now, how do I erase my browser history?

While I figure that out, you hit jump for more on why the National Labor Relations Board found no unfair labor practice when: (a) a unionized newspaper company, (b) with no social media policy, (c) which encouraged its employees to use Twitter, fired a reporter based on a few tweets.

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If you guessed 15 minutes, you would be right, according to a recent decision from the Third Circuit Court of Appeals.

And you don’t need to point a gun at the employee’s head? A rusty fork in the doo-dads “knowing and intelligent” waiver based on a “totality of the circumstances” will suffice.

What are those circumstances? Find out after the jump.

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Steroids are so 2010.

 

With high profile baseball players like Detroit’s Miguel Cabrera and Cleveland’s Shin-Soo Choo getting arrested this year for DUI, Major League Baseball aims to crack down on certain off-the-field conduct that could give the sport a black eye.

More on how this could factor into the upcoming collective bargaining agreement negotiations, after the jump.

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More than a quarter of people surveyed from around the world are going online in their hunt for work, but many are growing nervous about the potential career fallout from personal content on social networking sites, according to a recent survey.

Highlights of this report after the jump…

 

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Earlier this week, I wrote about a nurse who was fired and denied unemployment compensation benefits because, instead of medicating a patient, she was busy posting Facebook updates about a colleague who had soiled herself.

Oy!

But that’s nothing compared to the New England emergency room doctor who was fired for posting pictures of a patient on her Facebook page.

When will people every learn? More about the Facebooking doc and some tips for employers to avoid messes like these after the jump…

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“Doing What’s Right – Not Just What’s Legal”