There’s a certain irony when a TV personality gets fired for something caught on video

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And when that video goes viral on social media, it’s not only ironic but quite blogworthy.

So here we are…

Emily Crane at the Daily Mail reports here that a Philadelphia television reporter has been fired. The reason? Well, she got into it with a police officer outside of a comedy club. And her expletive-laden tirade was captured on video, posted to Facebook, and went hella-viral. According to Victor Fiorillo writing at Philadelphia Magazine (

The reason? Well, she got into it with a police officer outside of a comedy club. And her expletive-laden tirade was captured on video, posted to Facebook, and went hella-viral. According to Victor Fiorillo writing at Philadelphia Magazine (

Well, she got into it with a police officer outside of a comedy club. And her expletive-laden tirade was captured on video, posted to Facebook, and went hella-viral. According to Victor Fiorillo writing at Philadelphia Magazine (here), the video has been viewed more than one million times.

You can view the video here with the door closed because it is NOT SAFE FOR WORK.

The PhillyMag article contains a Q&A with the fired reporter, in which she claims to have since deleted all of her social media, and found out about her termination before learning about the infamous video:

I saw that PHL 17 removed most if not all references to you from their website. Are you out of a job?
When I came home, I called my producer to talk about why I was absent. I didn’t realize a video was out. I found out about it later, because HR called me and said I was being terminated. They said there’s a video. I said, “What video?”

There are many takeaways from this, but I’ll share the easy ones:

  1. The social media world is 24/7 and employees are responsible fnot only for what they post online, but also if what they say or do is captured by others and posted online.
  2. Even if what goes online has nothing to do with the workplace, you can still lose your job. Just ask the reporter.
  3. Freedom of speech rarely applies. It never applies to employees in the private sector, and especially not when you behave like this fired reporter. Just ask Riley Cooper, who was lucky to keep his job — at least for a little while.
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