Another bartender decided to liken beer to domestic violence. It was all captured on social media. [CBS Chicago]

An employee’s caustic Facebook post about a police shooting earned her a termination…and unemployment compensation benefits. [Technology & Marketing Law Blog]

Social media users did not respond well to the Undercover Boss episode about the owner who fired a bikini bartender for not wearing a bikini. [Jezebel]

Next time you run out of toilet paper in a train bathroom, try Twitter. [Huffington Post].

And by bearded dragon, I mean, well, bearded dragon.

This warning holds true even if you operate a reptile store. Chris Joseph of the Broward/Palm Beach New Times reports (here) that a Florida reptile store owner was “arrested on battery and cruelty to animal charges on Friday after he allegedly hit some of his employees with a live lizard multiple times.”

It’s all in this police report. Additionally, according to Joseph article, the same store previously had “hosted a roach-eating contest that ended up killing contestant after he choked on the dozens of roaches and worms during the contest.”

So the clear takeaway here is use bunny rabbits because they don’t hurt as much scrap those progressive discipline policies. Like the infamous “probationary period” when at-will employment begins — they’re at-will, silly — progressive discipline is a throwback to days when unions had more power in the workplace and could negotiate progressive discipline into a collective bargaining agreement. 

I’m not saying don’t give warnings and such before termination, but why restrict yourself that way?

And to those of you who say, “Silly, Meyer. We have an exception to our progressive discipline policy that allows the company to bypass progressive discipline, when deemed fit in the company’s discretion.” Well, ok, great. Just know that, when you create exceptions by deviating from the policy, you create disparate treatment claims.

Don’t handcuff yourself, consider ditching the progressive discipline policy. Instead, just treat employees fairly and equally.

It’s on now!

Late yesterday afternoon, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce issued a press release in which it announced that it had filed this complaint in federal court against the National Labor Relations Board to strike the Board’s election rules, passed last month, which would create faster union elections.

More on this lawsuit, after the jump…

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Or, at least, when you honestly believe that one of your employees is masturbating in the parking lot.

(Unless, of course, you’re like by buddy Fred, who operates Parking Lot Self-Gratification, LLC).

Let’s just pretend that parenthetical remained in my head, ok?

After the jump, it’s a lesson on the law of retaliation involving the case of a school district employee who was fired for allegedly masturbating in a car…in the school parking lot…during school hours. And he claimed that his firing was retaliatory in violation of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. 

Allow that to sink in for a sec, then hit jump while I kiss the head of my golden blogging statuette and rub her belly…

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I tell you, folks.

When a school janitor, the plaintiff in this case, claimed that the school principal uttered the words in the lede above, I felt a stirring within.

Literally, the second those words (allegedly) formed on the principal’s lips, my Spidey Bloggy-senses told me that I’d be able to usher in the new year with a fine blog post.

Comin’ atcha after the jump…

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Happy New Year’s Eve everyone. 

I’m going to end the year with a bathtub mint julep quick plug. Because I’m not at all subtle — bow before BlogStar! — I may have mentioned my firm’s new #SocialMedia Practice Group. And, as of last week, we now have a Twitter feed too.

If you follow me (@Eric_B_Meyer) on Twitter — and if you don’t, I will hunt you down and claw out your… — you’ve probably seen me retweeting a lot of great #socialmedia and #cyber news and nuggets coming from @DilworthSocial. So, if you want to cut out the middleman and follow @DilworthSocial on Twitter, well then, by all means…

And I’ll see you all in 2015.

Translation: Three days left in 2014 and Meyer doesn’t have it in him to put together an original post for you.

Fortunately, you guys continue to dig the other bazillion days of original content. As The Employer Handbook approaches its 4th birthday — if you’re thinking of a proper gift, find the one that blogs for me too and I’ll dedicate a week’s worth of posts to you — our 2014 numbers were staggering! The site had almost 150,000 users (up 30% from 2013). Those folks viewed 289,560 pages.

Here were the most clicked posts of 2014:

5. Sixth Circuit redefines the “workplace” when considering attendance as an ADA essential job function
4. Yes, you can fire an employee who discloses a disability at his termination meeting
3. An orgasm on a treadmill explodes an employee’s FMLA claim
2. Wages aren’t confidential, you guys. Your employees can discuss them.
1. Daughter’s Facebook post costs dad $80k employment settlement

Most creative Google search which landed someone on my blog is a tie between “achy breaky pelvis” (1 user), “how to screw your employer” (3 users), (9 users), and “naked twister” (14 users).

At least my readers have their priorities straight.

Because I love you guys, I’ll probably be back tomorrow and Wednesday with new posts.

Whether you have a disability under the Americans with Disabilities Act — so, like, all of us — or not, work can suck. Bosses can be jerks. 

But, if an employee with a disability requests a transfer away from a jerk boss, must the company provide it? 

Find out after the jump…

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