nlrb.jpgLast week, the National Labor Relations Board issued this memorandum in which it has instructed regional offices to encourage employees to file complaints with the United States Department of Labor if the the regional NLRB office “believes that an employer may have violated a substantive or anti-retaliation provision of [OSHA] or the FLSA.”

Remember that the National Labor Relations Act covers more than just unionized employers and workplace. For example, many of the social media cases involving the NLRB that you may have read about actually involve non-union workplaces. So, if you haven’t gotten the message already, this NLRB initiative is another wake-up call to get your house in order.

Otherwise, you may have multiple federal agencies up in your business.

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pinocchio.jpgI was reading this recent CareerBuilder survey, which reports that 58% of employers have caught a lie on a resumé. (Most popular lie: skills embellishment).

As, CareerBuilder is apt to do, the survey contained a section of some of the most outlandish lies ever caught on a resumé. 

Some that made that list include: Applicant included job experience that was actually his father’s. Meh.
Applicant claimed to have 25 years of experience at age 32. Getting warmer.

Then I scanned down and saw this doozie: Applicant applied to a position with a company who had just terminated him. He listed the company under previous employment and indicated on his resume that he had quit.

Dude!

What’s the best lie you’ve ever caught on a resumé? And how did you catch it? Let me know in the comments below.

When the new amendments to the the Americans with Disabilities Act took effect in 2009, the law became more employee-friendly by expanding the definition of what constitutes a disability.

That said, the law doesn’t (yet) require an employer to have a sixth sense about whether a disabled employee requires a reasonable accommodation.

Generally, an employee has to ask for it. Or, as we find out after the jump, an ADA failure-to-accommodate lawsuit is pretty much doomed.

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