Skyline of Times Square

Last week, the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission made headlines by filing its first lawsuits against private-sector businesses challenging sexual orientation discrimination as sex discrimination.

Meanwhile, yesterday, another federal court in Christiansen v. Omnicom Group, Inc. (opinion here) concluded just the opposite: sexual orientation discrimination is “reprehensible,” but does not violate Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

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SHRMLEG
Don’t answer that.

Instead, picture this: A well-dressed guy saunters into the Washington Renaissance. Don’t worry, before next week, I’ll wash the stains out of my Metallica hoodie. Ok, Ratt hoodie. Ok, N’ Sync hoodie. Ok, N’ Sync sleeveless hoodie.

He’s cool(ish) and snarky; he’s got an employment law blog and a license to practice law. He’s even got an employment law practice, which some* may say is thriving.

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We have an extra-special guest blogger today. It’s my mentee, Meaghan Londergan. (Sorry, folks, all of The Karate Kid images were copyright protected). Sadly, I no longer work with Meaghan. But, in her defense, there’s only so much Meyer that a young impressionable associate can take. Since then, Meaghan’s been a real mover and shaker. Now, she’s a Partner at Freeman Mathis & Gary, LLP.

I also want to give a shout out to Meaghan’s law clerk Erika Mohr, a third-year law student at the Drexel University, Thomas R. Kline School of Law, graduating May 2016. If I taught Meaghan anything — Meaghan, did I teach you anything? Don’t answer that. — it’s to delegate responsibility, especially on law-related articles. So, let’s assume that Erika did all the heavy lifting on this guest post.

If you want to reach Meaghan, maybe hear some blackmail old Meyer war stories, you should connect with her on LinkedIn. Ditto for Erika, less the dirt. And if you want to guest blog on an employment-law topic at The Employer Handbook, email me.

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Small Businesses - geograph.org.uk - 682645.jpgIn this press release, the EEOC announced yesterday that it has a new guide for small businesses to comply with federal anti-discrimination laws.

And if some of you bigger businesses want to check it out too, I won’t tell anyone. Well, unless you count the illuminati.

By Mary and Angus Hogg, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=13230811

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Yesterday, I blogged here about the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission‘s first lawsuits challenging sexual-orientation discrimination as sex discrimination. While part of the EEOC’s Strategic Enforcement Plan to address emerging and developing issues, getting federal courts to agree that sexual-orientation discrimination is unlawful under Title VII is an uphill battle.

But, that doesn’t stop American businesses from creating and enforcing their own rules in the workplace against LGBT discrimination.

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US-EEOC-Seal

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is officially stepping into the ring and taking the fight to private-sector employers whom the EEOC believes has discriminated against workers on the basis of sexual orientation. Yesterday, the EEOC announced (here) that it had filed two complaints in federal court against employers whom it alleges engaged in anti-gay bias.

Oh, it’s on now!

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medicalleaverequest

Among other things, the Family and Medical Leave Act affords an eligible employee up to 12 weeks of leave from work in 12-month period for a serious health condition that makes the employee unable to perform the essential functions of his or her job. We know that, to take covered leave, an employee doesn’t have to specifically reference the Family and Medical Leave Act or say “F-M-L-A” .

How, then, can an employee put the company on notice of the need for covered leave?

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