Articles Posted in Social Media and the Workplace

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In Pennsylvania, the Rules of Professional Conduct require that an attorney must stay abreast of changes in changes in the law, including the benefits of advances in technology.

LinkedIn was founded over 10 years ago. If you’re reading this and you are not familiar with LinkedIn …

I mean, geez. For a litigator, it’s absolutely essential. And I’m not even talking about having a LinkedIn profile.

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As I type this post, I’m watching two of my kids — one dressed as Olaf; the other Elsa — yelling at each other to stop singing Frozen tunes. Now, they’re wrestling — I don’t remember that from the movie. For a snowman, that Olaf is pretty tough. Oh, damn! Parent of the year here has let it go — see what I did there — on too long.


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Last year, at about this time, I blogged here about a case involving some employees who thought that their employer had underpaid them. So, they discussed the matter at work. And then continued their conversation on Facebook, where they used language that wouldn’t quite make an Eagles fan in the 700 level of old Veteran’s Stadium blush. But, it would have earned a young Meyer some soap in the mouth.

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366 - 350: You can't shut me up


One of the finest employment-law bloggers, Daniel Schwartz, recently marked the eight-year anniversary of his Connecticut Employment Law Blog with a post about the three most notable changes in employment law over that span. Number one was social media.

While for us bloggers, social media presents the lowest-hanging clickbait fruit, its metamorphosis and overall effect on the workplace is undeniable. Social media presents a slew of issues, from hiring (all those state laws on social media passwords) to firing (like the time those Facebook postings bungled an employee’s FMLA claims) and so much more.

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Social-media-for-public-relations1The recent uptick in activity on my “fired AND Facebook” Google Alert suggests that individuals with jobs continue to struggle with social media (Exhibit A, B). However, according to a recent survey from the Society of Human Resource Management (SHRM), 65% of surveyed employers found their new hires through social media this past year. LinkedIn was the most popular social networking platform for sourcing job candidates. Indeed, 87% of HR professionals said it was either “very or somewhat important for job seekers to be on LinkedIn.”

But, wait, there’s more…

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