Articles Posted in Philadelphia

I didn’t stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night. But, even if I had, heck, I could move in to a Holiday Inn Express for a month and still not have anything intelligent to offer when one of my clients brings up the Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare).

Now, I’m guessing that some of you have ACA dartboards migraines questions. (Something other than WTH?!?!?).  I’m going to do one better than refer you to our Employee’s Benefits Practice Group.

My firm is hosting a free Affordable Care Act breakfast briefing on Tuesday, July 21, 2015 at 8:15 am at our office in Philadelphia, PA. Not only can you participate in a roundtable discussion about impending reporting requirements relating to the Affordable Care Act and related healthcare reform and compliance issues, but you get access to ACA compliance nerds from both my firm and Deloitte.

If nothing more, you get fried oreos and Meyer in a dunk tank free breakfast and some HR/CLE credits. But, what’s especially nice about this session is that it will afford plenty of opportunity for the audience to ask questions.

Space at this event is limited. If you’d like to attend, e-mail me.

Hope to see you there.

If you are a Philadelphia employer, check out my post from February and this poster. While the new law requires employers of 10 or more to provide paid sick leave, those with 9 or few employees must still provide unpaid sick leave. If you haven’t done so already, update your employee handbooks.

For the rest of you (and, I suppose, my Philadelphia employer readers too), the results of yesterday’s Facebook poll are in…and not all that surprising.

71% of those who responded would fire an employee who identifies herself on Facebook as one of your employees and, in a status update, praises the murder of two police officers. Others would either discipline/counsel the employee (21%), or do nothing to the employee (4%). One of you would consult the company’s social media policy before taking action. Another one of you would discuss with the employee first and then decide what to do.

And one more of you would “Put her on a one-way flight to Itan or Notth Korea.”

It’s even better with the misspellings. In fact, I’m just going to leave that there and walk away from the computer now.


Back in December, I warned you (here) that, after two failed attempts to enact paid sick leave in Philadelphia, the third time may be the charm in 2015.

I was right.

(Want to rub my head for good luck? Or hire me as your employment lawyer? Yeah, let’s go with the second one.)

Yesterday, Mayor Nutter signed into law a paid sick leave bill that passed City Council by a vote of 14-2. The new law, which will apply to businesses with at least 10 employees, will allow employees to accrue an hour of paid sick leave for every 40 hours of work. It goes into effect in 90 days.

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My mind…blown!

Yesterday, the local internet feeds were flooding us with news that Philadelphia Eagles running back LeSean McCoy allegedly left a 20-cent tip at a local restaurant at which he and some friends had lunch on Monday. The “smoking gun” was a copy of what is purported to be McCoy’s lunch receipt from the restaurant.

I read “Eagles Player LeSean McCoy Just Left a 20-Cent Tip at PYT” on, and “LeSean McCoy tips 20 cents at PYT. The restaurant, PYT, even posted about it on its own Facebook page, complete with a copy of the supposed McCoy receipt.

I get that internet stories about a low-tipping professional athlete equal reader clicks. But how about a different angle; namely, that the person who posted a customer’s receipt on social media still has his job to return to today. Or that the restaurant itself is glorifying a practice of shaming customers — famous or not. (Remember the story of the employee who posted the Denver QB Peyton Manning’s huge tip on a dinner receipt? He lost his job). Fortunately, many of the Facebook users who commented on the PYT Facebook page get that posting meal receipts, large or small, is hella-stupid…

So, what do you think, folks? Take this poll and this poll and let me know what you think in the comments…

Was PYT right to post the receipt?


No free polls
What should happen to the PYT employee who posted the receipt?




Fired free polls

UPDATE (9/9/14 4:52 pm): About an hour ago, on PYT’s Facebook page, PYT’s owner addressed the kerfuffle that posting the receipt created.

UPDATE (9/10/14 2:52 PM): This.

Thumbnail image for philadelphia.jpgLast week, Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter signed this Executive Order, which will require that many city contractors provide a minimum wage of $12/hour beginning January 1, 2015. (Although, the Order will also apply to bids and proposals issued May 20, 2014).

The Executive Order also requires that contractors meet that same minimum wage standard for their first-tier subcontractors.

For more on which employers/employee qualify, read the Executive Order.

(Ordinarily, I’d include those requirements in this post. However, cut-and-paste from the Executive Order flipped me the bird).

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If you’re on LinkedIn, consider joining the discussion of news, trends and insights in employment law, HR, and the workplace, by becoming a member of The Employer Handbook LinkedIn Group. Tell ’em Meyer sent you.

pregnancyposter.pngBack in February, I reported here about the new pregnancy-accommodation law that went into effect in Philadelphia.

The law requires local business to provide reasonable workplace accommodations for employees who have needs related to pregnancy, childbirth, or a related medical condition.

The law also requires Philly employers to post notice of the new law in the workplace.

Here is that poster.

And here is some random music that has nothing to do with pregnancy, but has been burning a hole in my Spotify queue.

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P.S. – If you’re on LinkedIn, consider joining the discussion of news, trends and insights in employment law, HR, and workplace, by becoming a member of The Employer Handbook LinkedIn Group

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Whatcha doin’ two weeks from today?

Want to grab some breakfast with me? Maybe hear about what’s hot at the EEOC and get a legal roadmap for managing the aging workforce?

In you’re in the Philadelphia area and would like to learn more about these topics, then come on down to our offices on Thursday, April 24 at 8:30 AM for a free presentation with a complimentary continental breakfast. Lawyers can get CLE. HR credits will also be offered.

The only bad news is that you’ll have to hear me flap my gums for an hour about best practices to avoid becoming an EEOC target. And since I can’t seem to blog my way out of a paper bag, you can imagine how (in)articulate I’ll be. Fortunately, my co-presenter from the EEOC, Mary Tiernan, will rock thy world.

Plus, my Dilworth Paxson colleagues will school you on the legal issues of which you should be aware when dealing with your older employees.

If you are interested in attending, click here for more details and to RSVP.

Mention this blog and I’ll get you an extra pat of butter to go with your continental breakfast.

After all, I take care of my VIPs.

Thumbnail image for philadelphia.jpgLate last month, Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter signed this bill, which requires reasonable workplace accommodations for employees who have needs related to pregnancy, childbirth, or a related medical condition.

As noted in this prior post about Philadelphia’s new law, reasonable accommodations would include, but are not limited to, restroom breaks, periodic rest for those who stand for long periods of time, assistance with manual labor, leave for a period of disability arising from childbirth, reassignment to a vacant position, and job restructuring.

An employer can avoid having to provide a workplace accommodation, but will have the burden of proving “undue hardship.” The “undue hardship” factors generally mirror those found in the Americans with Disabilities Act and revolve around the cost of the accommodation and the employer’s overall financial resources.

Philadelphia’s new pregnancy accommodation law went into effect when Mayor Nutter signed the bill. Within 90 days, local employers will have to post notice of the new law in the workplace. The City is in the process of preparing that notice.